October 09, 2019

Are you looking for new all mountain skis?

We have you covered with our guide - a deep look into what style of all mountain skis best suit you and what length skis you should be getting.

*Please note that this is a unisex guide and our women's specific guide will be out soon!

General Types of All Mountain Skiers


The Cruiser

Cruiser - All Mountain Skis

The skier that wants to get out on the open runs and loves to hit the freshly groomer corduroy. The Cruiser likes to carve sweeping arcs but may throw in a quick turn here and there. The Cruiser may also want to get into mixed terrain like spring corn or some early powder - but knows that groomers are where they spend the most time.

Ski needs: strong edge grip, moderate flex, enough width for a variety of snow conditions.

Recommended skis

Recommended length

  • Top of head minus 5-10 cm

The Carver

Carving All Mountain Skis

The skier that loves to roll over their knees and really drive their skis into a quick turn. The Carver revels in the feeling of their skis making short radius railroad tracks in the snow and seeks out the freshly tilled groomers. The carver generally has a set of skis dedicated to hardpack and groomers. For all mountain skis, the Carver should look for skis with a moderate turning radius and a good amount of taper from the tip to tail dimensions (14 mm or more).

Ski needs: strong edge grip on hardpack, stiffer flex, enough width for a variety of snow conditions.

Recommended skis

Recommended length

  • Top of head minus 5-15 cm (between eyes and chin)

The Charger

Charger - All Mountain Skis

The skier that wants to ski fast and blow through anything in their path. The Charger is best characterized by aggressively driving into the tongue of their ski boots and loves to make larger radius turns. The Charger skis in a wide variety of terrain but loves the steeps.

Ski needs: stiff to medium-stiff flex, 95 mm+ waist width, mounting point at least 5 cm behind center.

Recommended skis

Recommended length

  • Top of head plus 0-10 cm

The Adventurer

The Adventure All Mountain Skier

The skier that is always looking for a new (and challenging) experience on skis and seeks out all types of terrain on the mountain. The Adventurer can often be found ducking into the trees one run, hitting groomers the next, then hiking to a powder-filled ridge. Versatility is the name of the game with the Adventurer.

Ski needs: easy to maneuver, twin tail, medium-stiff flex, 95 mm+ waist width, moderate to good flotation, edge grip on hardpack.

Recommended skis

  • Ahmeek 95 (moderate flotation, quicker edge-to-edge)
  • Ahmeek 105 (good flotation, stronger in heavy crud)

Recommended length

  • Top of head plus/minus 10 cm (shorter for more maneuverability, longer for stability)

The Powder Hound

Powder Hound All Mountain Skier

The all mountain skier that knows they won't be exclusively skiing powder, but seeks it out at any opportunity. The Powder Hound gets the first chair when the powder is fresh in the morning and then finds the hidden stashes throughout the mountain when the rest is tracked out. Often a close relative of the Adventurer, the Powder Hound seeks out new challenges when all the fresh snow is gone.

Ski Needs: good to great flotation, easy to maneuver, 105mm+ waist width, edge grip on groomers.

Recommended skis

  • Ahmeek 105 (good flotation, stronger in heavy crud, extremely versatile)
  • Ahmeek 115 (great flotation, slower edge-to-edge, not strong on ice)

Recommended length

  • Top of head plus 10 cm to minus 5 cm (shorter for more maneuverability, longer for stability)

The Jibber

The Jibber - All Mountain Skier

The all mountain skier that was likely a former park skier or a current park skier that wants to take their park skills all over the mountain. The all mountain Jibber finds all kinds of non-snow surfaces to hit, such as fallen logs propped up in the woods. Any time there is a roller to launch, the Jibber is sending it. The Jibber isn't worried about getting to the bottom the fastest, but always with style.

Ski Needs: full twintip tail, snappy flex, edge grip on hardpack, mounting point 2-7 cm behind true center.

Recommended skis

  • Sarge 95 (playful yet snappy flex, newschool mounting position only 3 cm behind center, can replace a park ski)
  • Ahmeek 95 (full twin, modern mounting position between center and traditional, lighter construction)
  • Ahmeek 105 (great complement to a park ski, more versatility in soft snow, lighter construction)

Recommended length

  • Top of head plus/minus 5 cm

 

Jeff Thompson
Jeff Thompson

Jeff Thompson is the product engineer and a founding partner at Shaggy's. He holds a degree in Mechanical Engineering from Michigan Technological University. While he is not designing skis, scheduling production, and working the the ski factory, he is on the hunt for new backcountry areas throughout Michigan with his wife, Stephanie!


3 Responses

Hayes Collins
Hayes Collins

April 17, 2020

I have an extensive collection of Shaggys skis and I guess each one has its situation. I like the 105 platform for fast light powder, the Tubby for spring conditions, and the 115 or bigger for days with more than boot deep snow or places like Big Sky or out west. The 115 is too big for Boyne or anywhere that doesn’t have steep terrain and snow. All Shaggys big powder skis are very nimble when you have powder under them but a 115 at Boyne on groomers is a 40 mph turn, it’s over before you get started, when they say big mountain charger they mean it. At Boyne and other smaller hills I like the softer narrower versions of their skis. I highly suggest getting the custom option for the flex quality of the ski. The Shaggy team will flex index the ski for your weight.

Jason Veith
Jason Veith

October 16, 2019

Cruiser that’s starting to like some adventure!
Ahmeek 95 – First time on Shaggy’s this year! Can’t wait! Bring on the snow!!

Jeff Coppes, O.D.
Jeff Coppes, O.D.

October 16, 2019

Definitely a charger—thus my purchase of Brock 95s.

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